This issue of paideia takes a critical look at the methods and sources we use to produce knowledge. These essays showcase new disciplinary methods applied both specifically to North Korea and more broadly.

issue 2: Critical Methods and the Challenges of (North Korea) Research

issue 2: Critical Methods and the Challenges of (North Korea) Research

fall 2021

fall 2021

Introduction

There’s an impulse to reflect, to take stock, heightened by these crisis times. The pandemic also makes us hyper aware of our senses, not just because symptoms of Covid-19 include the loss of smell. We now communicate through intermediating layers of screens and masks, and we must negotiate our relationship to the physical spaces around us. Of course, entry to knowledge production—archives, libraries, universities, and sites of fieldwork—have always been mediated by power, whether as access to passports and visas, funding for travel, language training, or other forms of capital. It seems an opportune time therefore to think critically about the methods and sources we use to produce knowledge. …

Co-editors of Critical Methods for the Study of World Politics: Creativity and Transformation (2019), Shine Choi, Anna Selmeczi, Erzsébet Strausz open this issue of paideia with an intimate conversation—including recorded sound morsels—about their book. They reflect on the “dirty business” of institutionalized education and research, urging us to rebuild pedagogy as an embodied experience that would authorize those directly engaged in learning. How do we break the mold of conventional knowledge production for genuine relief, that is, liberation? Picking up on this, anthropologists Lisa Min and Annie Malcolm juxtapose haunting images and evocative references to colors, materials, and places to ask what nostalgia can do as a kind of “historical emotion.” They offer an experimental way to access the rupture of the “post” in post-socialism to narrow the distance to “time out of time.” 

The subsequent essays showcase new disciplinary methods applied specifically to North Korea composed by scholars positioned in South Korea. They point to the added layer of methodological challenges that situated knowledge brings. Hee Sun Choi, as a practicing designer, places the “industrial arts” at the intersection of art, politics, and economy, highlighting potential insights of her approach despite the lack of direct access to objects of her study. Then, literary scholar Seong-Su Kim discusses the application of media studies and metadata analysis to North Korean literature to argue that recognition of “exiled” writers is the first step toward a literary history that encompasses both Koreas. Last but not least, Peter Moody as a PhD candidate “in the field” introduces two new resources in the study of North Korea, the Bukjoseon Sillok and the North Korean Music Resource Room at the National Gugak Museum.

Suzy Kim, editor

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Suzy Kim, editor